Biographical Sketch of Julia M. Hinaman

Biographical Database of NAWSA Suffragists, 1890-1920

Biography of Julia M. Hinaman, 1895-1927

By Siobhan M. M. Barco, J.D.

Julia Mabel Hinaman (1895-1927) was born in Broome County, New York to Henry and Harriet Hinaman. Her father, the son of German immigrants, worked as a blacksmith while her mother ran a hotel. Hinaman attended the co-educational Syracuse University where she completed a classical liberal arts curriculum and was a special student in the School of Oratory. While a student, she resided at Winchell Hall Dormitory and 703 Irving Avenue. She was a leader of the College Equal Suffrage Campaign, led the Woman's Editorial Page of the Syracuse Daily Orange student newspaper, and served as an organizer and speaker for various other social welfare causes. Hinaman graduated in June 1918 with honors and was elected to the Phi Kappa Phi Society for scholarship and achievement.

Shortly after graduation, Hinaman moved to Hartford, Connecticut where she boarded at the home of fellow suffragist Mary Bulkley on Asylum Avenue. She joined the staff of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), for whom she did political organizing, and served as publicity director. Additionally, she served as the Connecticut Circulation Chairman and wrote articles tracking the progress of suffrage legislation in Connecticut for NAWSA's official periodical The Woman Citizen. Hinaman's efforts for women's suffrage expanded beyond Connecticut. She represented the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association (CWSA) at the March 1919 NAWSA Jubilee Convention in St. Louis, Missouri. She additionally spoke at the Vermont State Suffrage Convention and wrote several pieces about the Women's Joint Congressional Committee in Washington, D.C.

After passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, Hinaman wrote an article detailing the transition of the CWSA to a Connecticut branch of the National League of Women Voters (NLWV). To finance the association's outstanding financial obligations before its dissolution, she served as auctioneer of suffrage novelties at the final annual convention of the CWSA in November 1920. Hinaman then became the chairman of publicity for the NLWV in Washington, D.C. Her duties included preparing press materials for regional conferences and national conventions and tracking federal legislation relevant to women voters. Hinaman also testified before the House of Representatives Committee on Education, representing the position of the NLWV on the Fess-Capper physical education bill.

After about two years in Washington D.C., Hinaman returned to Hartford where she resided at 57 Pratt Street. From 1922 to 1927, Hinaman lectured as a representative of the Connecticut Children's Aid Society on the subject of “What Connecticut Owes its Children.” Around this time, Hinaman also served as educational director in charge of the junior and publicity departments at the Chautauqua community in New Haven, Connecticut. In 1926, Hinaman became the head of publicity and advertising for the Connecticut League of Women Voter's Bulletin. A 1926 article by Pauline Kronman highlighted Hinaman's prominence as a press agent, a new profession that women were entering “in step with men.” Hinaman further served as the CLWV‘s Business and Advertising manager from September 1926 until her death from appendicitis in September 1927. She is buried in her family's plot in Riverside Cemetery, Endicott, New York.

In 1930, Hinaman was nominated for the NLWV National Roll of Honor as one of the “women famous throughout the country for the work they have done in securing the suffrage for women and in teaching them how to make their citizenship intelligent and effective.” While not ultimately part of the national list, she was included on the Connecticut State Roll of Honor. In 1934, the CLWV included Hinaman on a plaque honoring the “Connecticut women who helped win the vote for the women of their country 1848-1920.” The plaque is located on the ground floor of the Capitol building in Hartford.

Photographs:

A. Image from: The Hartford Courant. 1918. “New Hartford County Suffrage Organizer,” July 11, 1918. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Hartford Courant.

 

B. Image from: The Hartford Courant. 1920. “Suffrage Worker Leaves Hartford,” November 28, 1920. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Hartford Courant.

 

C. Image from: Dooly, Isma. 1921. “Current Events from A Woman's Point of View: Publicity Head.” The Atlanta Constitution, February 13, 1921. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The Atlanta Constitution.

 

D. Plaque honoring Julia M. Hinaman in the Connecticut State Capitol in Hartford, Connecticut. 1934.

The photograph can be found:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/gs-waymarking-images/1f0866c8-1431-4df0-910f-60c2ef16c14c.jpg

 

Sources:

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Collections Online. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.galegroup.com/tinyurl/6g5Eb4

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Bulletin of Syracuse University. Vol. XVII, 9 vols, 1917. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University. p. 393. Retrieved from https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015066592588;view=1up;seq=7.

Butler, Amy E. Two Paths to Equality: Alice Paul and Ethel M. Smith in the ERA Debate, 1921-1929. SUNY Press, 2012. p. 140.

Dooly, Isma. “Current Events from A Woman's Point of View: Publicity Head.” The Atlanta Constitution, February 13, 1921. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The Atlanta Constitution.

Hearing Before the Committee on Education House of Representatives Sixty-Sixth Congress Third Session on H.R. 12652. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1921. p. 63. Retrieved from https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=xq_A51xafecC&hl=en&pg=GBS.PA3

Hinaman, Julia M. “Goodbye Meeting of a Great State Association.” Woman's Journal, 27 Nov. 1920, p. 718+. Nineteenth Century Collections Online. Retrieved from: http://tinyurl.galegroup.com/tinyurl/6obiq6.

Hinaman, Julia M. “The Martial Adventures of a Presidential Suffrage Bill in Connecticut.” Woman's Journal, 17 May 1919, p. 1102+. Nineteenth Century Collections Online. Retrieved from: http://tinyurl.galegroup.com/tinyurl/6obmT0

Hinaman, Julia M. “Without Benefit of Governor.” Woman's Journal, 25 Sept. 1920, p.

447+. Nineteenth Century Collections Online. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.galegroup.com/tinyurl/6obob1

“In Honor of Great Women.” Women Voters Bulletin, vol. X, no. 2, 1930, p. 4. Nineteenth

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“Julia E. Hinaman (1895-1927).” Find A Grave, n.d. Retrieved from https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/60449752/julia-e-hinaman.

Kronman, Pauline. “Those Who Point the Spotlight.” Woman's Journal, Aug. 1926, p. 13+. Nineteenth Century Collections Online. Retrieved from: http://tinyurl.galegroup.com/tinyurl/6sQvm1

“Multiple Classified Advertisements.” Women Voters Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 6, 1926, p. 6. Nineteenth Century Collections Online. Retrieved from: http://tinyurl.galegroup.com/tinyurl/6sRNN0

National American Woman Suffrage Association. Handbook of the National American Woman Suffrage Association and Proceedings of the Jubilee Convention. Edited by Justina Leavitt Wilson. National Woman Suffrage Publishing Company, Inc., 1919. p. 308. Retrieved from: https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=5H0EAAAAYAAJ&hl=enpg=GBS.PA1

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