Biographical Sketch of Julia F. Abbott

Biographical Database of NAWSA Suffragists, 1890-1920

Biography of Julia F. Abbott, 1870-1935

 

By Anna Assogba, Research Librarian, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Vice President of Maryland Woman Suffrage Association

Julia F. Abbott was born in 1870 and died in 1935, in Baltimore, Maryland. She lived with her sister, Anna S. Abbott, in Baltimore for most of her adult life. They both worked as school teachers in the Baltimore public school system. Julia was elected to Vice-President of the Maryland Woman Suffrage Association in 1907 and 1908. In 1909, Julia and Anna were among the contributors to the Maryland W. S. A.'s proposal of a bill to the Maryland legislation for the right for women to vote, though ultimately the bill was unsuccessful. Julia and Anna also contributed to much of the work done by the Woman Suffrage Club of Baltimore in 1910-1911, which included regular public meetings and soliciting door-to-door and at the election polls. They also served as representatives of Baltimore County at Maryland state suffrage conventions. Upon Julia's death in September 1935, she left gifts to the Seventh Avenue Baptist Church of Baltimore, the East Baltimore Station Methodist Episcopal Church, the Home of the Aged of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the Shriners' Crippled Children's Hospital of Chicago, and the Florence Crittenton Mission.

Sources:

Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census. Lehi, UT, USA.

Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census. Lehi, UT, USA.

Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census. Lehi, UT, USA.

“Charitable Institutions Are Bequeathed $13,500: Will of Miss Julia F. Abbott Filed for Probate--Estate Estimated at $60,000,” The Sun (Baltimore, MD), September 27, 1935.

Funck, Emma Maddox, and Etta H. Maddox, “Maryland,” in Forty-Second Annual Report of the National-American Woman Suffrage Association Given at the Convention Held at Washington, D.C. April 14 to 19 Inclusive, vol. 42 (New York: National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1910), 115–16, https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/009793006.

Funck, Emma Maddox, and Etta H. Maddox, “Maryland,” in Forty-Third Annual Report of the National-American Woman Suffrage Association Given at the Convention Held at Louisville, KY, October 19 to 25 Inclusive, vol. 43 (New York: National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1911), 122-123, https://heinonline.org/HOL/P?h=hein.journals/wmsufpro43&i=122.

Laws of the State of Maryland Made and Passed, Maryland Session Laws (Baltimore, Maryland: 20th Century Printing Company, 1936), 52, https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/010134276.

Maddox, Etta, “State Correspondence: Maryland,” Woman's Journal (Boston, MA), January 25, 1908.

Polk's Baltimore City Directory 1922. Baltimore, MD: R. L. Polk & Co. of Baltimore, Inc., 1922. Accessed via Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995. Provo, UT, USA. (Also used years 1891, 1895, 1899, 1902, 1908, 1912.)

“The School Board: Annual Statement of President Morris--The Bi-Weekly Reports,” The Sun, (Baltimore, MD), January 15, 1890.

Stanton, Elizabeth Cady, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage, eds. History of Woman Suffrage, Vol. 6: 1900-1920, New York, NY: National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1922, 252. [LINK]

“Women Appeal to Congress,” The Sun (Baltimore, MD), November 25, 1908.

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