Biographical Sketch of Theodosia Ammons

Biographical Database of NAWSA Suffragists, 1890-1920

Biography of Theodosia Ammons, 1862-1907

By Clancy Dalton, student, Colorado State University

Theodosia Ammons was born in 1862, near Ashville, North Carolina. Her family moved to Denver, Colorado, when she was a child. Her father was a Baptist minister and church was an integral part of her life. Ammons attended East High School in Denver and graduated in 1883. Upon graduation, she began teaching in the Whittier and Gilpin schools in Denver. By 1895, Ammons was selected for a position in the domestic economy program at Colorado Agricultural College. After becoming a full faculty member in 1900, she went on to become the first female dean at Colorado Agricultural College in 1902. She also founded the Domestic Science Department at Colorado Agricultural College.

Through her teaching, Ammons became acquainted with suffragist Eliza Routt, who was the Governor's wife. Routt's connections and involvement in suffrage pushed Ammons to join the movement. Primary sources show that Ammons was involved in the suffrage movement by 1902. Ammons was sent as a delegate from Colorado to the 1902 annual convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), which met in Washington D.C.

Ammons was the secretary of the Colorado Equal Suffrage Association (CESA) and her friend Eliza Routt served as the president. The CESA had ties to NAWSA. Ammons remained involved in suffrage until her death in 1907.

A 1901 letter from the mayor of Fort Collins, Frederick D. Baker, demonstrates that he appointed Ammons to a committee, but the details are unclear.

Additionally, Ammons' papers show involvement in women's clubs within the state. In a postcard from Mary C. C. Bradford to Ammons, Bradford invited Ammons to participate in a meeting of the Board of Directors for the Colorado Federation of Women's Clubs. However, the extent of Theodosia's participation is unclear.

Ammons never married. Ill in the last few years of her life, Ammons passed away on July 17, 1907 in Denver, Colorado.

Sources

Amy K. Cornwall letter to Theodosia Ammons (Denver, CO), January 13, 1902. In "Theodosia Ammons Biographic Entry" (2008), at Colorado State University Archives and Special Collections, Morgan Library, Ft. Collins, CO.

Drew Haugen, "CSU's First Domestic Economy Instructor Taught Sewing, Female Equality," CSU Collegian, March 2, 2006. www.archives.collegian.com

"Fort Collins Timeline," Fort Collins History Connection, https://history.fcgov.com

Frederick D. Baker letter to Theodosia Ammons (Fort Collins, CO), February 27, 1901. In "Theodosia Ammons Biographic Entry" (2008), at Colorado State University Archives and Special Collections [CSUASC], Morgan Library, Ft. Collins, CO.

Mary C.C. Bradford letter to Theodosia Ammons, Denver, CO, October 12, 1903. In "Theodosia Ammons Biographic Entry" (2008), at Colorado State University Archives and Special Collections [CSUASC], Morgan Library, Ft. Collins, CO.

Monroe, I. N., Reverend. "In Memorium: Dean Theodosia Ammons," The Beacon, July 24, 1907. In "Theodosia Ammons Biographic Entry" (2008), at Colorado State University Archives and Special Collections [CSUASC], Morgan Library, Ft. Collins, CO.

Priscilla D. Hackstaff letter to Theodosia Ammons (Brooklyn, NY), March 29, 1902. In "Theodosia Ammons Biographic Entry" (2008), at Colorado State University Archives and Special Collections [CSUASC], Morgan Library, Ft. Collins, CO.

Theodosia G. Ammons, "The Colorado Non-Partisan Equal Suffrage Association," Fort Collins Courier, December 30, 1897. In "Theodosia Ammons Biographic Entry" (2008), at Colorado State University Archives and Special Collections [CSUASC], Morgan Library, Ft. Collins, CO.

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