"Boston Ladies' Boycott Agreement," Boston Evening Post, 12 February 1770, p. 4.

In the decade before the Revolution, women throughout the colonies signed public boycott agreements against English goods:

   … We join with the very respectable Body of Merchants and other Inhabitants of this Town, who met in Faneuil-Hall the 23d of this Instant, in their Resolutions, totally to abstain from the Use of TEA: And as the greatest Part of the Revenue arising by Virtue of the late Acts, is produced from the Duty [tax] paid upon Tea which Revenue is wholly expended to support the American Board of Commissioners: We the subscribers do strictly engage, that we will totally abstain from the Use of that Article… This Agreement we cheerfully come into, as we believe the very distressed Situation of our Country requires it, and we do hereby oblige ourselves religiously to observe it, till the late Revenue Acts are repealed.

— Excerpt from "Boston Ladies' Boycott Agreement,"
12 February 1770

3. What specific product did the Boston women boycott?

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4. What were the women protesting by boycotting this product?

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5. Why might the boycott have been an effective form of protest?

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